Fascinating impact craters on Earth

Fascinating impact craters on Earth

A crash hole is a depression in the ground thought to be caused by a meteor, asteroid, or comet hitting a planet or moon. In our solar system, all of the inner celestial bodies have been heavily attacked by meteors throughout their history. For example, this bombardment is clearly visible on the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and Mercury. However, the impact craters are constantly being erased by erosion or tectonic changes over time on Earth. The pits range from a few tens of meters up to about 300 km (186 miles) in diameter, and from recent times to more than two billion years old. You could see Fascinating impact craters on Earth and relatively small impact craters are included in this list.

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Kaali Crater

Kaali Crater

The Kaali crater was created by a meteorite that touched the earth somewhere between the 4th and 8th centuries BC. At an altitude of about 5-10 km, the asteroid breaks into pieces and falls to Earth in fragments. The largest crater is about 110 meters wide and 22 meters deep.

Within a 1-kilometer radius of the main crater, eight smaller craters were created during this bombardment. The entire forest on the Estonian island of Saaremaa was most likely burned down due to the impact of the collision. The crater is part of many Estonian stories and myths. Maybe Saaremaa is the legendary island of Thule, while the name “Thule” can be linked to the Finnish word tule (“fire”).

Tenoumer Crater

The Tenoumer Crater is almost a perfect circle located in the Western Sahara desert, Mauritania. The crater is 1.9 kilometers (1.2 miles) wide, and sports a rim of 100 meters (330 feet) high. The cause of this crater has long been debated by modern geologists. Some of them consider volcanoes to be the cause of the crater. A closer examination of the structure shows that the hard “lava” of the crater is actually molten rock due to a meteor impact. Between 10,000 and 30,000 years ago, this impact happened. One of the fascinating impact craters on Earth.

Wolfe Creek Crater

Wolfe Creek Crater

This well-preserved meteorite collision hole is in the flat plains on the northeastern edge of Western Australia’s Great Sandy Desert, about 150 kilometers south of Halls Creek. It is about 880 meters in diameter, and the base of the mostly flat crater lies 55 meters below the crater rim and about 25 meters below the sand field outside the crater. In the center of the crater, the ground is slightly raised. Here grow some surprisingly large trees that suck moisture from the crater’s water reserves remaining after the summer rains.

Monturaqui Crater

Monturaqui crater is located south of Salar de Atacama in Chile. The crater’s current size is approximately 460 meters (1,509 feet) in diameter, 34 meters (100 feet) deep. The collision probably happened about a million years ago. Due to the area’s harsh arid conditions, the crater is still clearly visible. In terms of size and morphology, the Monturaqui crater has many similarities with the Bonneville crater on Mars discovered by the Spirit rover in 2004. Both craters are shallow, the size of the blocks being pushed out close. The crater rim is similar and both are formed in a volcanic environment.

Roter Kamm Crater

Roter Kamm Crater

The Roter Kamm crater is located in the Namib Desert, Namibia. Fascinating impact craters on Earth. The crater is about 2.5 km (1.6 miles) in diameter and is 130 meters (400 feet) deep. About 3.7 million years ago, it was created by a meteorite the size of a large vehicle.

Although the crater was clearly visible, layers of sand at least 100 meters (300 feet) thick covered its foundation. The crater gives the impression of the Martian surface rather than the surface of our planet due to its association with the red-orange color of the Namib Desert.

Gosse’s Bluff

Gosse’s Bluff is located in the south of the Northern Territory, near central Australia, about 175 kilometers west of Alice Springs. The crater is thought to have formed by the impact of an asteroid or comet about 142 million years ago. The crater rim was originally 22 km long but has been eroded. The visible 5-kilometer-tall, the 180-meter-high structure is now the eroded remains of the crater’s central elevation.

Pingualuit Crater

Pingualuit Crater

Fascinating impact craters on Earth. Pingualuit Crater was created about 1.4 million years ago by an asteroid impact with the power of 8500 atomic bombs the size of the atomic bomb in Hiroshima. The 3.44 km (2.14 miles) crater diameter rises 160 meters (520 feet) above the surrounding tundra and is 400 meters (1,300 feet) deep. The crater lake is 270 meters (890 feet) deep and contains some of the purest water in the world.

The lake has no clear entrance or outlet, so water accumulates from rain and snow and is only lost by evaporation. The crater was discovered in 1943, by a United States Air Force plane on a meteorological flight. Pingualuit means “where land grows” in the local Inuit language.

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